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Peace at Christmas

Let peace come down this Christmas                

Upon a broken land                                                 

Let peace come down this Christmas time –      

And lets all take a stand                                        

 

Angel voices singing

On that Holy night                                              

To lead us out of darkness                                

Into the path of light – the path of light

Garth Hewitt

 

MP Mhairi Black, posting on Twitter on the night when UK MPs voted for war in Syria – “Very dark night in parliament. Will never forget the noise of some Labour and Tory cheering together at the idea of bombs falling.”

 

This will not be our finest hour: the dangerous rhetoric of war

Jill Segger December 7, 2015 – original article in Ekklesia Daily Bulletin here

 

We have to hope that committing a country’s armed forces to acts of war is one of the hardest decisions a politician ever has to make and one which makes the greatest demand on conscience. But observation makes it hard to rid oneself of a suspicion that many senior politicians have a not-so-secret desire to play the role of war leader.

 

Remember Margaret Thatcher in headscarf and goggles posing in the turret of a tank during the Falklands war? Tony Blair striving to look blokish and casual against a backdrop of bored-looking soldiers in Iraq? George Bush on the flightdeck of an aircraft carrier, sporting a USAF bomber jacket? And on Saturday (5 December), we saw the Defence Secretary, Michael Fallon at RAF Akrotiri with a fighter plane in soft-focus behind him, unable to suppress a smirk as he proclaimed: “We will hit them harder”. Read more…

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Garth’s music – a view on Garth’s journey in music, song and justice

Forty years ago Garth’s music and song lyrics challenged what had become the established way of doing things within the Christian church in the UK. Firstly, he was a part of the movement within Christian music away from a particularly “sacred” sound, not afraid to bring Christian lyrics towards the mainstream popular style of music. This bridged the culture gap for his own and following generations between the church and the world in which they lived, and helped many within those generations find a way to explore their spirituality without the need to deny their inherent culture.  It did also bring condemnation from some within the established Christian churches who felt that these musicians were endangering the purity of the church by in some way secularising it, so it was not always an easy road but there was growing support for this new attitude within the church so it was not entirely lonely.

  Read more…

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Interview with Kevin Mayhew publishers

By Sarah Sibley

 

Following on from Garth’s visit to the KM office last week, we decided an interview for our Blog was a must!  Below he  discusses his latest album ‘Justice like a river’, working with Cliff Richard, singing in Spanish and much more!

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‘Justice like a river’ is your 47th album!…will you be making a 48th, 49th, 50th?

“Yes, I’m already thinking about the next two albums so I will keep you in the picture on this!”

Read more…

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Talk at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Carol Service, 14th December 2010

I love the words of our reading from Isaiah chapter 9: “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light, those who lived in a land of deep darkness, on them light has shined.“

Then the words go on to talk about joy being increased because “the yoke of their burden… and the rod of the oppressor you have broken.  All the boots of the tramping warriors, all the garments rolled in blood should be burned as fuel for the fire.”

Read more…

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Psalmist of praise and protest

STREET children from Africa, South America, India and Europe playing football in a Durban area last March; it’s the Deloitte Street Child World Cup, and it shows off the human potential of children failed by every social and political system. Durban itself has 2,000 street children; the Umthombo organisation, founded five years ago, helps keep them safe and fed. Read more…

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’30’ album notes

Garth’s first album, “The Lion And The Lamb”, was recorded in 1972 at Air Studios, London with producer Pete Bye.  Released in’73, “The Lion And The Lamb” was succeeded the following year by “I Never Knew Life Was In Full Technicolor ‘Till I Saw It On The Silver Screen”, produced by Tony Hooper from The Strawbs.  “Love Song For The Earth”, released in 1976, was produced by Bryn Haworth.  Bryn’s style of playing, on slide guitar, mandolin and backing vocals, complemented Garth’s style, and although this is the only album Bryn produced for Garth, he appears on many of his other albums. I took the photos and designed this album.   It was the first of Garth’s albums to be released in the States, but unfortunately the American record company said that his picture wasn’t suitable because “Christians smile and shave” – we had to have another photo session to get Garth looking suitably Christian! Read more…

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Garth Hewitt writes redemption songs

and then sings them without fear.

His voice comes through clearly,

challenging us by his witness to act for justice. His is a brave voice,

needed more than ever in a fearful world, and in a sometimes timid church.

Please God, it will help us

sing redemption songs of our own.

 

The Revd Lucy Winkett

Rector, St James’s Piccadilly

previous Chair of Trustees of Amos Trust

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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